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Brief note of the Doddaballapura Taluk

    Doddaballapura taluk comes under Bangalore rural district. The total geographical area covered  78760  hectares and having five Hoblies namely:

            a) Doddabelavangala

           b) Thubagere

           c) Sasalu

           d) Madure

           e) Kasaba

           Doddaballapura Taluk has 29 grama panchayaths. The main activity of the taluk is manufacturing of silk clothes by power looms and other activities of the taluk are manufacturing of Veena and Thamburi, Pottery works, Agarbatti etc. There are  also different types of small scale and large scale industries setup in the industrial area and industrial estate.

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          DODBALLAPUR situated to the north-west of Bangalore is a sub-division and taluk centre. The place is covered on the north and north-west by a chain of mountains and offers an uneven land-scape with partially plain land area, and is on the bank of the river Arkawati. The place is directly connected by railway. Dodballapur was a celebrated commercial centre right from the Hoysala period. There is also a view that the town was founded by a feudatory Malbhairegowda of the Avati clan. Perhaps he fortified the existing town. During the period between the 16th-17th centuries, Dodballapur was administered by a branch of the Avathi clan. Towards 1637-38, the place was occupied by the Bijapur Commander Ranadaula Khan. For the next forty years, Dodballapur continued to be in the hands of the Bijapur Sultans, being a part of Shahji's Bangalore Jahgir.

         In 1689, it is taken by the Mughals, when the place was in the hands of Sambhaji, son of Shivaji, the latter having taken it from his brother Ekoji. The place was presented as a Jahgir to a Muslim chief Ali Khuli Khan. After his death, his son Darga Khuli Khan, the Nawab of Sira, received the town for a temporary period of one year as Jahgir. Later, for a span of fifty years, the place was under the Nawab of Sira when the Nizam of Hyderabad took over administration. It is described that one feudatory Abbas Khan received Dodballapur as Jahagir. In 1761, Haider Ali annexed the region and subsequently it passed on to the Wodeyars of Mysore. The place name Dodballapur is so named to distinguish it from Chikballapur. 

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        The place is found mentioned as Ballalapura thanya in a record dated 1598 AD from the local Adinarayana temple. It might have originated from Hoysala name Ballala, and later corrupted as Ballapura. According to a legend the place derived its name from the circumstance that a cow used to drop one `balla' of milk over a certain anthill and this omen led to the foundation of the town. From `balla' the name Ballapura was thus derived. Perhaps from the earliest times, the place is noted for silk weaving industry and many weavers also migrated to Bangalore from here. There is an extension in Bangalore called Ballapura Pete (present Rangaswamy gudibeedi). The town evidenced some disturbances during the Nagar uprising in 1830 when a large number of people from Madhugiri came to protest against the act of the Tahshildar of Dodballapur (one Venkatakrishniah), who during his term of office at Madhugiri as Tahshildar had failed to make proper adjustment of the revenue collected.  

           Of the many monuments seen in Dodballapur, the Ashur Khana and a big stone well are important. The Ashur Khana is said to have been built by Abbas Khuli Khan. It is a fine building in Indo- sarcenic style with a spacious compound having a tall enclosure on all the sides. Presently, the building is used for running a Urdu Primary School. The fort walls are not seen now, but the area has many fallen buildings and house foundations. A Hoysala stone inscription dated 1267 A.D. (now preserved in the taluk office) is of special interest as its top portion is used for inscribing a Persian record as well. 

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        This Persian record dated 1691 A.D. is of the time of the Mughal Emperor Aurangzeb. It says that in the 34th year of the reign of Aurangzeb (1689), the fort of Balapura - kariyat was in the hands of Samba Dud (Sambhaji), son of Siva Dud (Shivaji) and it came into the possession of the supreme Government and that in the 34th year of the reign, it was granted to one Shekh Abdhulla from Delhi. The place has four mosques of which, the Jamia Masjid near Ashur Khana is the biggest. There are seven Dargahs acribed to Ali Khuli Khan, Mohibuddin Allah-ud-din Chisti, Gauhar ullah Shah, Dilawar Ullah Shah, Hasan Shah and Kambal Posh Khadri. The Dargah of Mohiuddin Alla-ud-din Chisti is a fine structure. The Urus here is held during Safar when about 2,000 people assemble and special qawali programmes are also held. The Peers, Gauhar-Ullah-Shah and Kausar-Ullah-shah are said to be contemporaries. The Uruses of both of these take place during Safar. The last mentioned Kambal Posh Khadri Dargah is situated at the outskirts of the town over a tank-bund. The Urus at Dilawar-Ullah Shah is annually held around April.

          The town has important temples such as Venkataramana, Chowdeshwari, Ishawara, Someshwara, Janardana, Kashi Vishveshwara, Nagareshwara and Arkavati. The Venkataramana temple is a huge structure covered with a vast compound. The compound with stucco decorations has impact of Muslim architecture. In front of the square Garbhagriha is an oblong Navaranga having two cells with images of Padmavati in the left one and Vinayaka in the right one. Facing the Navaranga is a spacious horizontal Mukhamantapa having fine relief sculptures over its later Vijayanagara pillars. 

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        Over the Hara of the Mukhamantapa are small mortar niches having impressive stucco figures depicting the Bhagavatha episodes. The temple has a spacious inner Prakara with an outer Pradakshinapatha. At the entrance of the temple is a Rayagopura in recent style. There is a Shikara over the Garbhagriha built in later Vijayanagara style. The temple is believed to have been constructed towards the end of 18th century by a local officer under Haider called Arunachala Panth. Two relief images inside described to be of the Arunachala Panth and his wife Sehshamma on a pillar have been covered with plaster. Inside the temple, over a platform is kept a stone image of Lakshminarayana in   Vijayanagara style, measuring about one and a half metre in height, said to have been brought from the local Adinarayana temple.

         The annual car festival in honour of lord Venkataramana is held on Magha Poornima  day and the Jatra is held for a span of nine days, when about 10,000 people assemble. To the south of the Venkataramana temple is the temple of Arunachaleswara, also acribed to the same Arunachala Panth, built during the same time. This had been repeatedly renovated. It has a central Garbhagriha with two more cells built adjacently on either sides, having images of Ganapathi and Parvati. Facing this is a Mukhamantapa with pillars in later Vijayanagara characters. Beside this temple is the local Shankara Matha having images  of Sharada, Adi Shankara and Vinayaka. Nearby, in the Devanagapete is the Chowdeshwari temple (renovated, described as over 300 years old. 

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        There are three Garbhagrihas in a row housing Shivalinga (central), Chowdeshwari and four mosques of which, the Jamia Masjid near Ashur Khana is the biggest. There are seven Dargahs acribed to Ali Khuli Khan, Mohibuddin Allah-ud-din Chisti, Gauhar ullah Shah, Dilawar Ullah Shah, Hasan Shah and Kambal Posh Khadri. The Dargah of Mohiuddin Alla-ud-din Chisti is a fine structure. The Urus here is held during Safar when about 2,000 people assemble and special qawali programmes are also held. The Peers, Gauhar-Ullah-Shah and Kausar-Ullah-shah are said to be contem- poraries. The Uruses of both of these take place during Safar. The last mentioned Kambal Posh Khadri Dargah is situated at the outskirts of the town over a tank-bund. The Urus at Dilawar-Ullah Shah is annually held around April.

              The town has important temples such as Venkataramana, Chowdeshwari, Ishawara, Someshwara, Janardana, Kashi Vishveshwara, Nagareshwara and Arkavati. The Venkataramana temple is a huge structure covered with a vast compound. The compound with stucco decorations has impact of Muslim architecture. In front of the square Garbhagriha is an oblong Navaranga having two cells with images of Padmavati in the left one and Vinayaka in the right one. Facing the Navaranga is a spacious horizontal Mukhamantapa having fine relief sculptures over its later Vijayanagara pillars.   

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            Over the Hara of the Mukhamantapa are small mortar niches having impressive stucco figures depicting the Bhagavatha episodes. The temple has a spacious inner Prakara with an outer Pradakshinapatha. At the entrance of the temple is a Rayagopura in recent style. There is a Shikara over the Garbhagriha built in later Vijayanagara style. The temple is believed to have been constructed towards the end of 18th century by a local officer under Haider called Arunachala Panth. Two relief images inside described to be of the Arunachala Panth and his wife Sehshamma on a pillar have been covered with plaster. 

        Inside the temple, over a platform is kept a stone image of Lakshminarayana in Vijayanagara style, measuring about one and a half metre in height, said to have been brought from the local Adinarayana temple. The annual car festival in honour of lord Venkataramana is held on Magha Poornima day and the Jatra is held for a span of nine days, when about 10,000 people assemble. To the south of the Venkataramana temple is the temple of Arunachaleswara, also acribed to the same Arunachala Panth, built during the same time.

     This had been repeatedly renovated. It has a central Garbhagriha with two more cells built adjacently on either sides, having images of Ganapathi and Parvati. Facing this is a Mukhamantapa with pillars in later Vijayanagara characters. Beside this temple is the local Shankara Matha having images of Sharada, Adi Shankara and Vinayaka. Nearby, in the Devanagapete is the Chowdeshwari temple (renovated, described as over 300 years old. There are three Garbhagrihas in a row housing Shivalinga (central), Chowdeshwari and Parvati. There is a small Navaranga totally renovated. After this is a frontal Mantapa built in 1845. 

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               Of the other temples in the place, mention may be made of Kashi Vishweshara (renovated), Someshwara (outside the town), Kalika Kamateshwara, Nagareshwara and Vaikunta Janardhana. The Kalika Kamatesh- wara temple is perhaps the oldest and has two typical Vijayanagara pillars with jumping hypogriff motifs. The Vaikuntha Janardhana temple near the bus stand is built in later Vijayanagara style. The outer Mantapa has pillars in Mysore style with fine relief sculptures. The Nagareshwara temple has three Garbhagrihas in a row with images of Ganapati, Linga and Parvati enshrined in them.

         The place has a Raghavendra Matha built around 1964. There is a Shaiva Matha opposite Kashi Vishveshwara temple, with a Gudduge ascribed to a saint Shankara Shivananda Gaganarya. Inside the taluk office compound is an ordinary Marti temple around which are many antiquities like images of Mahishamardini (Ganga times) and Durga and broken pieces of Hoysala pillars. The pillars might belong to the Gavareshwara temple in the fort area as referred by the Hoysala stone record dated 1267 A.D. also preserved in the taluk office. The very name `Gavareshwara' suggest that the temple must have been patron deity of the merchants and the temple has received a grant from the traders of Rajaghatta as per the above record. The town also has a Mahaveera Svetambara Basti built recently in north Indian style. The place has a Catholic Church. The place was a centre of freedom movement with T.Siddalingayya, the first president of Mysore Congress hailing from here. On the Bangalore road is an industrial area housing many modern industries like Himatsingka Saide producing silk fabrics or Dodballapur Spinning Mill.

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